Valentines Day Message From The Moon

Apparently our Moon misses us, and would like us to come back soon!

The original image is of a lunar crater, made famous by a sharp-eyed observed who was browsing the public LROC data set

If you aren’t aware of the The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera, it is designed to address two of the prime LRO measurement requirements:

 

  • 1.) Assess meter scale features to facilitate selection of future landing sites on the Moon.
  • 2.) Acquire images of the poles every orbit to characterize the polar illumination environment (100 meter scale), identifying regions of permanent shadow and permanent or near-permanent illumination over a full lunar year.

 

In addition to the above objectives, the LROC team is conducting meter-scale mapping of polar regions, stereo images that provide meter-scale topographic measurements, global multi-spectral imaging, and a global landform map.

The LROC Center at Arizona State University also houses one of a handful of Lunar samples – Apollo Sample 15555.

Sample 15555 is a sample of lunar basalt – a type of volcanic rock. The sample dates back to nearly 3.3 billion years ago. The sample on display in the LROC Visitor Gallery at ASU is a small piece of original rock – one of the largest and most studied basalt samples collected at the Apollo 15 landing site.

If you’d like to learn more about Apollo Sample 15555,

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